COVID-19 has claimed more than 1.25 million lives since the SARS-CoV-2 appeared in December 2019. Obesity has been shown to be a risk factor for poorer outcomes. However, it is unclear whether the association of obesity with poorer outcomes is gender specific. The authors of a new article on this topic Explore the relationship on this blog.

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has claimed more than 1.25 million lives since December 2019 when the severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) occurred. To date, almost 50 million people have had a confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, the clinical spectrum of which ranges from asymptomatic infection to severe COVID-19 with critical illness.

Obesity has been shown to be a risk factor for poorer outcomes in patients with COVID-19. However, it remains unclear whether all classes of obesity are associated with worse outcomes or whether this is specific to severe obesity. In addition, it is unclear whether the association of obesity with poorer outcomes is gender specific.

It is unclear whether the association of obesity with poorer outcomes is gender specific.

The pathogenetic mechanisms involved in COVID-19 infection are not yet fully understood. However, it is known that a major cause of disease severity and death is an excessive host inflammatory response to SARS-COV-2, which is associated with high levels of circulating cytokines. like interleukin-6 (IL-6).

Obesity is viewed as a condition of increased chronic inflammation. Therefore, it was believed that the predisposition to systemic hyperinflammation is one of the main mechanisms by which obesity leads to poorer outcomes in COVID-19.

Our study investigated whether there was an association between obesity in men and women with hospital outcomes in 3,530 consecutive patients hospitalized for COVID-19 at a tertiary medical center in the Bronx, New York. Additionally, our study attempted to assess the role of systemic inflammation using IL-6 levels as a surrogate for the outcomes of obese inpatients with COVID-19.

Our study showed that obesity classes II and III in men and obesity class III in women were independently associated with higher hospital mortality in patients with COVID-19. The male population with severe obesity was the main driving force behind this club. No significant association was found between BMI and IL-6.

Several possible pathogenetic mechanisms have been described by which obesity independently increases the risk of poorer outcomes in patients with COVID-19. Severe obesity can impair lung function by directly altering the mechanical properties of the lungs and chest.

Severe obesity can impair lung function by directly altering the mechanical properties of the lungs and chest

In addition, obesity has been shown to be a mild condition of chronic inflammation due to a poorly understood interplay between adipocytes and cells of the immune system that leads to impaired immune function. Obesity is also linked to a disturbed gut microbiota that would otherwise directly prevent the invasion of pathogens, including SARS-CoV-2.

Finally, the fact that ACE2 is also expressed in adipose tissue, mainly visceral fat, suggests that severely obese individuals can ingest a significantly higher viral load, leading to local inflammation at the ectopic adipose tissue level and making this population more susceptible to the Development makes COVID more severe. 19 and this effect may not be easily measurable by measuring systemic cytokine levels.

Particular attention should be paid to protecting the severely obese population from SARS-CoV-2, prioritizing access to vaccinations, remote working, telemedicine and other measures as the risk of adverse outcomes is higher after a diagnosis of COVID-19. In addition, patients with severe obesity diagnosed with COVID-19 should receive special attention given the high risk of poorer outcomes.

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