Crystal growth & design Author functions highlight authors from the journal according to subject area. Each featured author has published at least five articles in the magazine in the past five years. This quarter we met with researchers who specialize in inorganic chemistry and coordination chemistry. Read the interview highlights from the authors featured this month:

Professor Xutang Tao, Shandong University

Professor Xutang Tao, Shandong University

Tell me about yourself.

I am a professor at Shandong University’s State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials. In 1983 and 1986, I received my BS and MS in chemistry and condensed physics from Shandong University under the direction of Professor Minhua Jiang. In 1995 I got my Ph.D. in functional materials from Tokyo University of Agriculture & Technology, Japan, under the direction of Professor Seizo Miyata. My research interests include crystal growth, lasers and nonlinear optical crystal materials, as well as organic and organic-inorganic hybrid photonic materials.

Why publish your work in Crystal Growth & Design?

Crystal growth & design focuses on the growth and development of new crystalline materials and covers my research interest.

What initially attracted you to your area of ​​expertise?

I wanted to know why “growth” was used for crystals and “preparation” for other materials.

What is the main unsolved problem in your area?

The main unresolved question in this area is, “How can we get crystals with the expected properties?”

What do you like best about your job?

I prefer to work on my job with lots of new crystals with different compositions, structures and properties that have grown in my laboratory.

What’s the best advice you’ve ever been given?

The weakness of crystals is their fragility, and growing crystals requires special care.

Professor Tori Z. Forbes, University of Iowa

Professor Tori Z. Forbes, University of Iowa

Tell me about yourself.

I grew up on a farm in rural Nebraska and am a first-generation student. I received my BS in Chemistry from Beloit College, Wisc., And then spent two years as a research technician at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. I have my Ph.D. at the University of Notre Dame and then was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Davis. I am currently an Associate Professor at the University of Iowa, where my group studies structure-function relationships in a variety of crystalline materials.

Why publish your work in Crystal growth & design?

Crystal growth & design is the pre-eminent journal for work related to crystal engineering, nucleation and growth of materials and the development of an atomistic understanding of material properties. It is an important medium for communicating my work to the community and an important resource for developing new research ideas.

What initially attracted you to your area of ​​expertise?

I have always been fascinated by how the properties of materials begin with how the atoms are arranged in a crystalline lattice, and precise control of these atoms will allow us to precisely control their properties. This aspect in combination with the creativity that it takes to develop new materials inspires me every day anew for my work.

What is the main unsolved problem in your area?

Development of a mechanistic approach to material design and related properties. Organic chemists have been able to use NMR spectroscopy and other techniques to develop retrosynthetic pathways. We need to develop more tools to study mechanisms involving inorganic elements and to develop energy landscapes to understand nucleation and growth pathways at the atomic level.

What do you like best about your job?

My favorite part is looking after students and undergraduate students. I love to see them grow during their time in my laboratory and to see how they develop into confident and independent chemists.

What’s the best advice you’ve ever been given?

I was worried about starting a tenure-track faculty position at an R01 institution, and my postdoctoral advisor Alex Navrotsky told me, “Do good science and the rest will come.” As always, she was right!

Dr. Katsuya Teshima, Shinshu University

Dr. Katsuya Teshima, Shinshu University

Tell me about yourself.

I am a Distinguished Professor at my alma mater, Shinshu University, where I received both my BS and MS in materials chemistry in 1995 and 1997. In 2003, I took a short break from Shinshu University to do my Ph.D. in materials chemistry and engineering from Nagoya University. Now, back at Shinshu University, my laboratory focuses on crystal growth and material design, especially the synthesis of various functional materials through flux and flux coating processes.

Why publish your work in Crystal growth & design?

Crystal growth & design covers all aspects of crystal growth – from the basics to application. When authors publish in the journal, they become acquainted with scientists and engineers in the field and can network with them.

What initially attracted you to your area of ​​expertise?

I was fascinated by the beautiful atomic arrangement of a single crystal and watched it develop a characteristic crystal facet. The flux method has the potential to control both elements freely, which would allow us to develop new devices. I am interested in seeing how the field evolves and how this work progresses with the wisdom of the researchers.

What is the main unsolved problem in your area?

The main unsolved problem in this area is the systematization of the theories of river crystal science. Currently, many researchers rely on their experience and intuition.

What do you like best about your job?

My favorite part of my job is growing a beautiful single crystal with my research group using our flux method. It makes me forget every need.

What’s the best advice you’ve ever been given?

There is also a lesson to be learned in failure.

Stay tuned for the next round of featured authors in the next quarter of the following Crystal growth & design on twitter.

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